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1916-2016

Publications

Publications

The SGT publishes a range of monographs, reports and conference proceedings that provide definitive texts on subjects of direct relevance to those working in glass and related areas.

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Apsley Pellatt on Glass Making

APSLEY PELLATT (1791-1863) was a well-known London glass-maker who took over the family firm in 1826 on the death of his father. Early in his career he developed a technique for encapsulating ceramic medallions in glass which led to his first publication in 1821. He was keenly interested in all aspects of glass making and became an acknowledged authority on its history but he was as interested in the latest developments and that led him to offer Michael Faraday the facilities of his works for the latter�s early experiments on making optical glass. He is today chiefly remembered for his copiously illustrated Curiosities of Glass Making published in 1849 which he addressed to the interested public. In it he explained the methods used to make many different types of glass ware. Six colour plates showed many notable pieces of ancient glass including the Naples vase, as impressive a demonstration of Roman skills as the Portland vase. Pellatt was a public-spirited man who for some years served on the Common Council of the City of London and, towards the end of his life, was a Member of Parliament. This volume, the fourth in this chronological series, includes all known publications by Apsley Pellatt and his father, Apsley senior, who has until now been ignored in the literature. 300 pages, 156x234 mm, softback, black and white illustrations and colour plates. ISBN 0-900682-54-X

Price:

£ 25.00

Basic Optical Stress Measurement in Glass

During the manufacture of all glass products, both temporary and residual stresses develop. Such stresses arise as a consequence of the manufacturing processes and for proper process control to be exercised it is necessary to be able to quantify these stresses. The optical method of experimental stress analysis, known as photoelasticity, has been used very effectively in the evaluation of the stresses occurring in structures of varying complexity, together with their components, when subjected to specified loading conditions. As the photoelastic technique requires materials that are both transparent and birefringent and many glasses exhibit these properties, this method of analysis can be used to determine the stresses in glass products.
There are many texts dealing with photoelastic analysis and its applications, but they are not aimed specifically at the assessment of residual stresses in glasses. This publication offers a practical guide providing information on the various optical arrangements and interpretation of results from typical plant apparatus, it is of general interest to those making stress measurements within the glass industry. H.W. McKenzie & R.J. Hand

Price:

£ 27.50

Bontemps on Glass Making

BONTEMPS ON GLASS MAKING: the Guide du Verrier of Georges Bontemps Translated by Michael Cable 624 pages including black and white figures, ISBN 978-0-900682-60-5 Georges Bontemps (1799–1884) was probably the most skilful and adventurous European glass works manager of his age. His life began inauspiciously because he was illegitimate and ignored by his father, a graduate of the École polytechnique and army officer. In 1817 Georges was refused entry to the École polytechnique, despite having done well in the entry examination. Bontemps then became assistant to Dartigues, owner of three separate works making lead crystal, and was soon managing the glass making at Baccarat. By 1822 he was directing the glass works at Choisy-le-Roi which was unusual in making several kinds of glass including window glass, lead crystal, domestic wares such as drinking glasses, stained glass windows, and optical glass. At Choisy-le-Roi he was responsible for several major advances. He remained there until 1848 when he moved to England to work for Chance Brothers in Smethwick for six years before returning to France. His Guide du Verrier, published in 1868, is the most detailed known authoritative description of the glass making practices of his time. Its seven sections describe the techniques of glass melting and making window glass, plate glass, bottles, lead crystal, optical glass, and stained glass windows. Bontemps had firsthand experience of all of these except making cast plate. Dozens of batch recipes are given, especially of coloured glasses. The book is copiously illustrated. One of its unique features is an analysis of the economics of the process at the end of each section. Bontemps on Glass Making: the Guide du Verrier of Georges Bontemps The fifth in a series on how the understanding of glassmaking advanced over the course of three centuries from the early 1600s to around 1870. Volume 1. Art of Glass by Christopher Merrett (1662) Volume 2. Bosc D'Antic on Glassmaking (1758–1780) Volume 3. Early Nineteenth Century Glass Technology in Austria and Germany: the works of Professor B. Scholz and Factory Superintendent Kirn (1820–1837) Volume 4. Apsley Pellatt on Glass Making: Publications by Apsley Pellatt senior & Apsley Pellatt junior (1807−1849)

Price:

£ 40.00

Borate Glasses, Crystals & Melts 7

Borates 7 Borate glasses, Crystals & Melts

Price:

£ 50.00

Borate Glasses, Crystals & Melts 9 and Phosphate Materials 2

Borate Glasses, Crystals and Melts 9 and the International Conference on Phosphate Materials 2

Bosc D'Antic on Glass-Making

This is the second of three volumes illustrating progress in understanding glass making from the 17th century to the early part of the 19th. Translated by Michael Cable, Including essays on faience and the assaying of ores. Published 1758-80

Price:

£ 25.00

Ceramics & Glass Basic Science HARDBACK

This book deliberately brings together ceramics and glass because there is much information, normally attributed to one area which seriously affects the other. It has been written for students, potters and glassmakers working individually or in small studios. It is intended to be a source of understandable information. Charles Bray was Principal Lecturer responsible for ceramics and glass in the Faculty of Art and Design at Sunderland Polytechnic, now the University of Sunderland. He was responsible for initiating the degree course in glass and ceramics and was involved in the setting up of the first Glass Centre in Sunderland. He organised many conferences and these various activities stimulated much of the development of the major glass interest in the area. He was active for many years as treasurer and membership secretary of British Artists in Glass, and its first elected life member. He served on the panel of Northern Arts for many years, is a Fellow of the Society of Glass Technology, is an honorary Fellow of the University of Sunderland and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. He now has work in most of the major glass collections and exhibits mostly in Europe. He has been invited to take part in several international exhibitions and in many exhibitions of British Glass. 2000, 234 mm × 156 mm, 280 pages with colour illustrations throughout, Hardback, ISBN 0-900682-30-2

Price:

£ 15.00

Ceramics & Glass Basic Science PAPERBACK

This book deliberately brings together ceramics and glass because there is much information, normally attributed to one area which seriously affects the other. It has been written for students, potters and glassmakers working individually or in small studios. It is intended to be a source of understandable information. Charles Bray was Principal Lecturer responsible for ceramics and glass in the Faculty of Art and Design at Sunderland Polytechnic, now the University of Sunderland. He was responsible for initiating the degree course in glass and ceramics and was involved in the setting up of the first Glass Centre in Sunderland. He organised many conferences and these various activities stimulated much of the development of the major glass interest in the area. He was active for many years as treasurer and membership secretary of British Artists in Glass, and its first elected life member. He served on the panel of Northern Arts for many years, is a Fellow of the Society of Glass Technology, is an honorary Fellow of the University of Sunderland and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. He now has work in most of the major glass collections and exhibits mostly in Europe. He has been invited to take part in several international exhibitions and in many exhibitions of British Glass. 2000, 234 mm × 156 mm, 280 pages with colour illustrations throughout, Paperback, ISBN 0-900682-32-9

Price:

£ 10.00

Chemical Technology of Glass

Eberhard Zschimmer's Chemical Technology of Glass, with 176 Figures aand sixteen plates, The property of Jena Glassworks, Printed for  private distribution 1913, Translated by Michael Cable 2013.

ISBN 9780900682698

Price:

£ 55.00

Coloured Glasses

The constitution of coloured glasses, the colours of glasses produced by various colouring ions and other additions are explained in this classic work. In addition, fluorescence, thermoluminescence and solarisation are also described. 1951 (fifth reprint 1999), 216 mm × 137 mm, 558 pages, black and white illustrations, ISBN 0-900683-06-X

Price:

£ 35.00

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